Type Here to Get Search Results !

As Europe kicks off a new school year, students are set to learn important life lessons.

As Europe kicks off a new school year, students are set to learn important life lessons.


 

Many of Europe's children are returning to school this week, but for some pupils and their teachers, the new term features some harsh lessons in life.

Burned down in riots

Many of Europe's children go back to school this week, but for some pupils and their teachers, the new term features some harsh lessons in life. One such incident occurred at Bois de l’Etang primary school in La Verrière, west of Paris, which was burned down in riots. Headteacher Céline Carpentier-Maxant surveys the damage caused by protestors earlier in the summer. The protests centered around the death of a young man at the hands of the police.

 

Carpentier-Maxant expressed the complexity and trauma of the situation, stating, "It's complicated. It's been very, very traumatic for the team because we're left with nothing. We've got nothing left, in fact. You can see that it's a bit empty. We've had donations of equipment and supplies that we'll be collecting this afternoon, which have been received by the town hall."

 

One of the teachers shared her initial reaction to the news of the schools being targeted and its impact on the students, saying, "It was a real incomprehension. It was: 'Why the school? What have we done?' A lot of the children, especially the younger ones, were afraid that we were in the school at the time because, for them, we slept in the school. So there was a lot of fear for their teachers too. And we had a lot of time to talk. A lot of psychologists were able to come and talk to the children, so that was reassuring too. It reassured the children to see us in good health and strong in front of them too."

 

While repair works are underway at the two damaged schools, 55 pupils from La Verrière will begin their term in neighboring schools in the town."

 

Poland’s teachers demand more pay

In Poland, many of Europe's children go back to school this week amidst a demonstration by 3,500 teachers and their supporters outside the Ministry of Education and Science in Warsaw. They are rallying to demand a 20 per cent pay raise and increased investment in schools and teacher recruitment.

 

Sławomir Broniarz, the president of the Polish Teachers' Union, emphasized the critical juncture of Polish education, stating, "Polish education is at a critical turning point. The question is how we will get out of this twist, it is a question about the future of students, about the future of education, education workers. It's all in our hands."

 

Children in Poland return to school on Monday, 4 September, and on 15 September, Poland’s National Alliance of Trade Unions (OPZZ) is set to picket parliament, calling for wage increases for all public sector workers, including teachers.


Serbia’s curriculum to allow time for pupils’ anxiety

As many of Europe's children returned to school, the new term commenced in Serbia on Friday, 1 September. The schools in the country embraced the youngest students with a warm welcome, and a notable change in the curriculum now addresses student anxiety and stress.

 

This new approach follows a tragic incident in which Serbia's schools concluded their academic year early on 6 June. Just over a month prior, a 13-year-old boy from Vladislav Ribnikar elementary school in Belgrade had opened fire, injuring nine students and a school guard. This shocking event ignited a nationwide discussion on issues related to gun ownership and violence.

Tags

Post a Comment

0 Comments
* Please Don't Spam Here. All the Comments are Reviewed by Admin.